Also on View > Sanctuary Print Shop

 
 
Friday, Nov 16, 2018-Sunday, Mar 10, 2019
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Sanctuary Print Shop is a project by artists Sergio De La Torre and Chris Treggiari. In a moment when the world seems more divisive than ever, these artists give us the opportunity to reimagine the possibility of connecting to each other. Transforming the museum into a space for collaboration, dialogue, and action, De La Torre and Treggiari invite visitors to raise their voice as they activate the print shop through a series of workshops and conversations with immigrants, lawyers, activist, and others.

Sanctuary Print Shop originated at the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts in San Francisco, exploring the history of the sanctuary ordinance in the state of California. Here at MCASD, the timeline documenting this history will examine San Diego’s relationship to immigration.

In the spring of 2018, the San Diego City Council voted to join an amicus brief opposing the Trump administration’s lawsuit against so-called sanctuary city laws. However, the San Diego County Board of Supervisors and the City’s mayor supported the administration’s lawsuit against sanctuary policies, and opposed the California Values Act (SB 54). In an effort to protect immigrants, the California Values Act (SB 54) limits cooperation between law enforcement and federal authorities, ensuring that state and local resources are not used to support any attempts by federal authorities to carry out deportations.

Today, more than 5,000 troops have been deployed to assist Customs and Border Protection (CBP) along the border with Mexico. Meanwhile, 90,000 commuters continue to cross between Tijuana and San Diego each day, making this region vibrant, diverse, and economically strong.

This project makes a bold proposition—to transform the Museum into a sanctuary. For centuries, people facing oppression and persecution have found solace in churches, temples, and other places of refuge where law enforcement has no jurisdiction. Can museums today similarly serve as a healing and safe space? Can we find relief in the possibility of working together to amplify our voices and empower our community? Can we recognize, as one of the posters in the project states, that this is “THE COUNTRY OF THE IMMIGRANT”?

MCASD’s Fayman Gallery, located at 1001 Kettner Blvd., will serve as a communal pop-up printing studio that aims to raise awareness about the recently enacted immigration policies, showing how these policies affect our communities.

Join us from 12 to 1:15 PM on select weekend dates as we create posters and foster dialogue in a place of safety.

Print Shop Activation Dates:
Sunday, December 2
Saturday, December 15
Sunday, January 6
Saturday, January 12
Sunday, January 20
Saturday, January 26
Sunday, February 3
Saturday, February 9
Sunday, February 24
Saturday, March 2