Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego (MCASD) Announces Exhibition Schedule Through June 2016

 
 
Wednesday, Jun 17, 2015 - 3:42 pm

San Diego, CA—The Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego’s (MCASD) exhibition schedule for the coming year presents an emphasis on focused, one-person shows. The roster includes a painting exhibition by Ed Ruscha which uses the Museum’s early canvas, Ace, as a starting point; a presentation of Do Ho Suh’s fabric installations; and a selection of new canvases by esteemed Mexican painter Alvaro Blancarte.

Several commissioned projects will consider the region’s geography and cultural history, including Anya Gallaccio’s site-specific installation; Byron Kim’s reference to the Panama-California Exposition; a rumination of the region’s “impossible railroad;” and Virginia Beahan’s photo essay on the Salton Sea. 
 
Other upcoming exhibitions include a presentation of contemporary works from San Diego’s private collections, two smaller photography exhibitions, a collaboration with University of San Diego that will highlight both organizations’ print collections, and the reinstallation of two, notable highlights from MCASD’s permanent collection: Robert Irwin’s 1°2°3°4°, and Ernest Neto’s untitled installation of hanging polyp-shaped sculptures.
 
This schedule is current as of June 8, 2015. Please discard previous schedules and call to confirm all information at 858 454 3541 x116, or via e-mail at pdwyer@mcasd.org.
 
For interviews and high-resolution images, please contact Communications & Marketing Manager Leah Straub or Communications Associate Patricia B. Dwyer. 
 
On view at MCASD La Jolla
 
Dear Nemesis, Nicole Eisenman 1993–2013
Through September 6, 2015
 
The largest definitive mid-career survey of the work of celebrated American artist Nicole Eisenman to date, Dear Nemesis, Nicole Eisenman 1993–2013 includes more than 120 works, charting the development of Eisenman’s practice across painting, printmaking, and drawing from the 1990s to the present.
 
Over the past 20 years, Eisenman has developed a creative and versatile vision that combines high and low culture with virtuosic skill. Fusing centuries-old art-making conventions and a multitude of art historic influences—including impressionism, German expressionism, and twentieth-century social realist painting—with contemporary subject matter, she depicts settings and themes as varied as bar scenes, motherhood, and the plight of the artist. Among her core concerns are depictions of community, identity, and sexuality.
 
Eisenman’s continual representation of women (both “butch” and “femme”) and female love not only imbues the practice of figurative painting with an audaciously queer bent but also recasts art history in a feminist light. Her wit spares no one and nothing, and it is indeed through her humor and the discomfort caused by her work that she communicates the multifaceted richness of the human condition. Her incisive sociopolitical critique operates through the quotidian and the absurd in ways that are both formally playful and visually breathtaking.
 
Dear Nemesis, Nicole Eisenman 1993–2013 has been organized by the Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis and curator Kelly Shindler. Major support for the exhibition and catalogue has been provided by the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts; Koenig & Clinton, New York; Karin and Peter Haas; Susanne Vielmetter Los Angeles Projects; Ringier AG, Zürich; Galerie Barbara Weiss, Berlin; Cathy and Jonathan Miller; Richard Gerrig and Timothy Peterson, and the Hall Art Foundation.
 
Funding for the San Diego presentation is made possible by generous lead funding from the Dow Divas Investment Group. Additional underwriting support has been provided by Fenner Milton and proceeds from the 2014 Biennial Art Auction. Institutional support of MCASD is provided by the City of San Diego Commission for Arts and Culture and the County of San Diego Community Enhancement Fund.
 
SARAH CAIN blue in your body, red when it hits the air
Through July 19, 2015
 
With SARAH CAIN blue in your body, red when it hits the air, MCASD presents Los Angeles-based artist Sarah Cain’s first solo museum project. Expanding the notion of the traditional solo exhibition, her paintings on canvas appear next to works by other artists—all selected by Cain, from her personal collection, borrowed from her peers, and from the Museum’s permanent collection. Together, they create a constellation of Cain’s most central concerns and influences, and a kind of portrait of her work and practice. 
 
At its root, Cain’s work aims to coax painting, as a medium, into unbridled territories. She contends with abstract painting’s fraught history, its broad and fertile present, and its potential future. Her work at once borrows from the lineage’s artistic strategies and enacts a disruption in its traditional formal and ideological constraints. Cain investigates painterly concerns such as color, form, and the space of the canvas, while imbuing them with flares of emotional, psychological, relational, and bodily forces. The works speak at once to painting as a medium and a lived experience.
 
Many of Cain’s strokes, drips, and flat planes of paint recall movements past—largely male-dominated genres—while her specific colors, pleasurable and redolent of popular culture, music, fashion, and perceived grounds of femininity, invoke an artist navigating her lived world. Braided string, plastic crystals, and beads; she folds into her paintings objects that function on a purely formal level, while simultaneously invoking an intimate specificity. They serve as ambiguous totems to trigger memory and emotion.
 
blue in your body, red when it hits the air includes selections from the Museum’s permanent collection by Ana Mendieta, Alfred Jensen, John Divola, and Fred Sandback. Also featured are works from Cain’s collection by Regina Bogat and Beatrice Wood, as well as a sculpture on loan from Andrea Zittell.
 
SARAH CAIN blue in your body, red when it hits the air is organized by the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego and made possible by proceeds from the 2014 Biennial Art Auction. Institutional support for MCASD is provided by the City of San Diego Commission for Arts and Culture and the County of San Diego Community Enhancement Fund.
 
Prospect 2015
Through September 6, 2015
 
For the past 30 years, MCASD’s premier Membership groups—the International and Contemporary Collectors—have provided significant funds for the acquisition of new works for the Museum’s collection through their annual dues. Each year, MCASD’s curatorial staff organizes an exhibition of works, entitled Prospect, to be considered for acquisition by the Collectors. One or more of these works are then selected by ballot at the Annual Selection Dinner. This funding by the International and Contemporary Collectors has allowed MCASD’s curators the vital support to discover new artists, enrich the MCASD collection, and build an engaged and informed community of collectors in San Diego. This year the Collectors selected works by James Drake, Nicole Eisenman, and T. Kelly Mason and also considered pieces by John Coplans, Thomas Demand, and Carrie Mae Weems.
 
Prospect 2015 is organized by the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego, with funding provided by MCASD’s International and Contemporary Collectors and the 2014 Biennial Art Auction. Institutional support for MCASD is provided by the City of San Diego Commission for Arts and Culture and the County of San Diego Community Enhancement Fund.
 
Robert Irwin
Through September 6, 2015
 
Robert Irwin’s subtle yet majestic 1°2°3°4° has been re-installed in the Krichman Family Gallery. For the popular work from the Museum’s permanent collection, pronounced “first dimension, second dimension, third dimension, fourth dimension,” Irwin removed three rectangular pieces from the large windows that border three sides of the gallery space. A key work in Irwin’s oeuvre, this site-determined, light-responsive installation harnesses the gallery’s exceptional view to a particularly rigorous and surprising perceptual investigation.
 
1°2°3°4° is characteristic of the work Robert Irwin is celebrated for, exploring illusion, perception and experiential effects. Known for his transformative pieces that helped to define the aesthetic of the 1960s West Coast Light and Space movement, Irwin continues to explore how phenomena are perceived and altered by consciousness.
 
Robert Irwin is organized by the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego and made possible by proceeds from the 2014 Biennial Art Auction. Institutional support for MCASD is provided by the City of San Diego Commission for Arts and Culture and the County of San Diego Community Enhancement Fund.
 
 
Virginia Beahan: Elegy for an Ancient Sea
July 25 through September 6, 2015
 
Virginia Beahan’s haunting photographs of the Salton Sea and its surrounds capture the lake’s layered history and precarious present. In Elegy for an Ancient Sea, Beahan presents images from her explorations of the California desert, as she brings a nuanced eye to the landscape’s fraught past. Through her visually sumptuous photographs, the Salton Sea becomes a kind of character, struggling to sustain life as its physical reality deteriorates.
 
The Salton Sea, 85 miles east of San Diego, stretches across the Imperial and Coachella Valleys. California’s largest lake, the Salton Sea was created in 1905, the result of an engineering accident. When irrigation canals, dug to feed water from the Colorado River into the valley, flooded, water rushed into the historically dry lakebed. The newly formed lake experienced a tourism boom in the 1950s and 60s, then dubbed “The Riviera of the West.” Now fed largely by agricultural runoff and drainage systems, the lake is not only shrinking, but also rapidly increasing in levels of salinity. These continuing changes have resulted in the killing of the lake’s once-great variety of fish, the decrease of the nearly 400 species of birds that use the area as a rest stop on migration paths, toxic dust storms, and a strong sulfur odor, as well as a steep decline in the local economy. 
 
Beahan’s photographs capture markers of the Salton Sea’s layered history as it manifests in the present. Some images feature rust-colored water, bare expanses of lakebed, and fish carcasses. Others record the state of abandoned homes and dilapidated trailer parks. One group of images documents the so-called Slab City, an abandoned military zone now a self-organized, off-the-grid community known for its brightly colored sculptures and makeshift architecture.
 
Like these markers of human creativity and perseverance, Beahan’s images evoke an incongruous beauty. They mourn the Salton Sea’s degeneration while simultaneously suggesting threads of hope for regeneration. And underlying the photographs’ allure exist questions and warnings about the implications of human intervention into the natural environment. 
 
Virginia Beahan: Elegy for an Ancient Sea is organized by the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego and made possible by proceeds from the 2014 Biennial Art Auction. Institutional support for MCASD is provided by the City of San Diego Commission for Arts and Culture and the County of San Diego Community Enhancement Fund.
 
San Diego Collects 
September 26, 2015 through January 10, 2016 
 
Featuring a selection of works from private collections around San Diego, this exhibition aims to recognize that the cultural resources of our city are thriving not only within the walls of our museums, but also through the efforts of many committed individuals. With a glimpse into private collections, San Diego Collects showcases the diversity of art our region has to offer. Works by both established and emerging, international and local artists attest to the fullness of the community’s collecting spirit.
 
San Diego Collects is organized by the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego and made possible by proceeds from the 2014 Biennial Art Auction. Institutional support of MCASD is provided by the City of San Diego Commission for Arts and Culture and the County of San Diego Community Enhancement Fund.
 
Francisco Goya and Rafael Canogar 
September 26 through November 29, 2015
 
This fall, MCASD and the University of San Diego (USD) will join resources to present Francisco Goya and Rafael Canogar, an exhibition featuring prints by the two Spanish artists from each institution’s collection. Between 1810 and 1820, Francisco de Goya (1746-1828) created his celebrated print series, Disasters of War, in response to the horrors of the Peninsular War in Spain. In the 1969 series The Earth and La Violencia, Rafael Canogar likewise addressed themes of conflict and violence, this time those occurring on the world stage, such as the Vietnam War, Mao’s Cultural Revolution, and Francisco Franco’s regime in Spain. Goya’s seminal prints, a cornerstone of USD’s collection, and Canogar’s more recent series, never before seen at MCASD, together speak of the long arc of war and its traumas, both in Spain and at large.
 
Francisco Goya and Rafael Canogar is organized by the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego and made possible by proceeds from the 2014 Biennial Art Auction. Institutional support of MCASD is provided by the City of San Diego Commission for Arts and Culture and the County of San Diego Community Enhancement Fund.
 
Tim Mantoani: Behind Photographs
December 5, 2015 through January 10, 2016 
 
San Diego-based Tim Mantoani has spent the last six years making portraits of the photographers responsible for some of the most iconic images in our popular cultural consciousness. While these images are instantaneously recognizable, their makers often remain unknown in mainstream culture, their names appearing in fine print and their likenesses rarely shown. Using a 20 x 24 Polaroid camera, Mantoani shoots these photographers holding their favorite or most famous images. William Wegman appears with a life-size photograph of his Weimaraner dog Bobbin. Nick Ut presents his Pulitzer Prize-winning image of a young girl during a napalm attack in Vietnam. Michael Halsband poses with his double portrait of Andy Warhol and Jean-Michel Basquiat, both sporting boxing gloves.  In Tim Mantoani: Behind Photographs, MCASD features a selection of more than 20 of Mantoani’s images, which address the relationship between image and image-maker, while simultaneously paying homage to the visual chroniclers of our age.  
 
Tim Mantoani: Behind Photographs is organized by the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego and made possible by proceeds from the 2014 Biennial Art Auction. Institutional support of MCASD is provided by the City of San Diego Commission for Arts and Culture and the County of San Diego Community Enhancement Fund.
 
Ed Ruscha Then & Now: Paintings from the 1960s and 2000s
January 30 through April 24, 2016
 
This exhibition takes as its starting point Ruscha’s early Pop painting Ace (1962) from MCASD’s Permanent Collection, exploring the word “ace” as a recurring motif in his practice over the years. The iconic artist first gained attention in the 1960s for work that combines text and image with deadpan takes on American vernacular culture. An innovator of West-Coast Pop and Conceptual Art, Ruscha’s work defies and exceeds both categories, drawing upon popular media, commercial culture, and the landscape of Los Angeles. The exhibition builds upon MCASD’s long-standing relationship with Ruscha: the Museum’s collection holds 30 works by the artist including the outdoor mural Brave Men of La Jolla (1995-1996).
 
Ed Ruscha Then & Now: Paintings from the 1960s and 2000s is organized by the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego and made possible by generous lead underwriting support from Pauline Foster, and proceeds from the 2014 Biennial Art Auction. Institutional support of MCASD is provided by the City of San Diego Commission for Arts and Culture and the County of San Diego Community Enhancement Fund.
 
On view at MCASD Downtown
 
Gravity and Grace: Monumental Works by El Anatsui
Through June 28, 2015
 
El Anatsui’s artworks embody a wide array of artistic techniques and aesthetic traditions, as well as layers of cultural meaning. Tapping into personal experience—his upbringing and education in Ghana, teaching and art making in Ghana and Nigeria, and his global travels—he creates art that represents ideas specific to his life and environment yet also speaks to universal themes of human connection and change.
 
Gravity and Grace features Anatsui's signature hangings composed of discarded liquor bottle caps, milk tin lids, and aluminum printing plates. Anatsui uses copper wire to connect countless units of cut and folded metal into massive expanses. The frugality of the materials and this patchwork technique suggest the mass consumption habits that his accumulations evidence, and counter the opulence of the finished objects. Whether hanging from the ceiling or on the wall, Anatsui’s works are refigured and draped anew each time they are installed. Malleable and shimmering, they bridge painting and sculpture, taking on a different form with every installation. He wishes for his art to remain fluid, reflecting the ever-changing nature of life. The exhibition's 11 metal objects, along with Anastui's wall reliefs of reclaimed wood and works on paper, currently fill MCASD Downtown’s 10,000-square feet of gallery space, with the largest piece spanning 35 feet.
 
Gravity and Grace: Monumental Works by El Anatsui is organized by the Akron Art Museum and made possible by a major grant from the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation. The San Diego presentation is made possible by generous lead underwriting gifts from Dr. Paul Jacobs and Sheryl and Harvey White. Additional funding has been provided with proceeds from the 2014 Art Auction. Institutional support of MCASD is provided by the City of San Diego Commission for Arts and Culture and the County of San Diego Community Enhancement Fund.
 
Anya Gallaccio
July 17 through November 1, 2015
 
Anya Gallaccio is known for installations that employ organic materials that are subject to change and decay—flowers and fruit, sugar and ice—even as her work is inflected with a minimalist vocabulary suggesting durability and timelessness. Gallaccio’s work was first exhibited at MCASD in 1994 as part of inSITE, and has since been presented in numerous international solo exhibitions, at institutions including Tate London (2003); Palazzo delle Papesse, Siena (2005); Sculpture Center, New York (2006); Camden Art Centre, London (2008); and Artpace, San Antonio (2013). Gallaccio will have a forthcoming solo exhibition at MASS MoCA in North Adams, MA. Her work is included in numerous public and private collections, including the Tate London; Victoria & Albert Museum, London; and Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney. A nominee for the prestigious Turner Prize in 2003, the British-born artist is based in San Diego and teaches at the University of California San Diego.
 
Anya Gallaccio is organized by the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego and made possible by proceeds from the 2014 Biennial Art Auction. Institutional support of MCASD is provided by the City of San Diego Commission for Arts and Culture and the County of San Diego Community Enhancement Fund. 
 
John D. Spreckels and The Impossible Railroad
July 17 through November 1, 2015
 
In an exhibition that will help celebrate the Centennial of Balboa Park’s 1915 Panama-California Exposition, artists Suzanne Hellmuth and Jock Reynolds will take as their point of departure MCASD Downtown’s Jacobs Building. Once the baggage terminal of the historic Santa Fe Depot, the westernmost stop on the San Diego & Arizona railroad, the building was constructed under the ownership of John D. Spreckels. Hellmuth and Reynolds are creating a layered, multi-media installation employing working model trains, projected historic photographs, and an abundance of vintage luggage. The exhibition will evoke both the construction and many challenges that beset what became known as the “Impossible Railroad.” The artists will explore how John D. Spreckels, San Diego’s great pioneering business leader and benefactor, pressed on against every imaginable setback to fully complete America’s southern transcontinental railroad route.
 
Hellmuth and Reynolds began collaborating together in San Francisco during the 1970s and have produced numerous site-specific performances, multi-media installations, and public artworks that have engaged selected historical events and institutions across America and Europe. Notable among these was their year-long residency that engaged the history of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where radar was developed and then deployed to great effect during World War II. They worked to organize a Centennial artistic celebration that helped to instigate the renewal of the first major library and community center that Andrew Carnegie built and opened in 1889 for his steelworkers and their families in Braddock, Pennsylvania. The duo also created a public artwork that explored the establishment of the School of Forestry’s famed tree collection and medicinal herb gardens on the campus of the University of Washington in Seattle, Washington.
 
John D. Spreckels and The Impossible Railroad is organized by the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego and made possible by proceeds from the 2014 Biennial Art Auction. Institutional support of MCASD is provided by the City of San Diego Commission for Arts and Culture and the County of San Diego Community Enhancement Fund.
 
Pond Lily Over Mushroom Cloud: Byron Kim Adapts the Black on Black Cosmology of Maria Martinez
July 17 through November 1, 2015
 
Pond Lily Over Mushroom Cloud: Byron Kim Adapts the Black on Black Cosmology of Maria Martinez presents a new project by La Jolla-born, New York-based artist Byron Kim, produced on the occasion of the Centennial of the Panama–California Exposition. Known for his monochromatic paintings, Kim explores subjects of cultural identity, race, politics, and art history, all in the guise of pure abstraction. In Pond Lily Over Mushroom Cloud, Kim’s interest lies in the Panama–California Exposition’s ethnography exhibits, which staged displays of living Native Americans performing various activities, from making traditional crafts, to cooking, to ceremonial dancing. Maria Martinez (1887-1980), an established ceramicist from the San Ildefonso Pueblo in New Mexico’s Rio Grande Valley, was featured demonstrating her famed revival of a traditional Pueblo style of black-on-black pottery. Kim takes Martinez’s signature aesthetic as his point of departure for a new series of minimalist paintings, taking cue from her monochromatic color, geometric and animal motifs, and even her making process. With these works, Kim confronts notions of craft, primitivism, modernism, and the fraught legacy of events such as the Panama-California Exposition.
 
Pond Lily Over Mushroom Cloud: Byron Kim Adapts the Black on Black Cosmology of Maria Martinez is organized by the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego and made possible by proceeds from the 2014 Biennial Art Auction. Institutional support of MCASD is provided by the City of San Diego Commission for Arts and Culture and the County of San Diego Community Enhancement Fund.
 
Ernesto Neto
November 19, 2015 through February 21, 2016
 
Brazilian artist Ernesto Neto’s monumental, untitled installation featuring hanging polyp-shaped sculptures will be re-installed in the Farrell gallery to celebrate this favorite from the Museum’s permanent collection. Made of fragrant spices such as lavender, cloves, and turmeric stuffed into skin-like Lycra fabric, these works will be suspended throughout the gallery, engaging the visitors’ senses of sight and smell. 
 
Ernesto Neto is organized by the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego and made possible by proceeds from the 2014 Biennial Art Auction. Institutional support of MCASD is provided by the City of San Diego Commission for Arts and Culture and the County of San Diego Community Enhancement Fund. 
 
Alvaro Blancarte: Marking the Present
November 19, 2015 through February 21, 2016
 
For more than six decades, Alvaro Blancate has been mining the topographies of Baja California and defining the artistic landscape of this region with his mark. Inspired by the mythologies of the Kumiai culture, as well as the light that shines on the sensuous boulders of the mountains of Tecate and the idyllic sceneries described in Latin American literature, Blancarte experiments with textures, materials, and colors to depict the splendor of the deserts of Baja California. Using sands and marble powder mixed with acrylic and enamel paints, he makes a mark on the canvas—a primal mark—that of a human incising the land to share a story and leave behind a trace of his presence. In Atavico II, 2014 [Atavic II], Blancarte reveals the legacy of the land with a cartographic incision that exudes a vibrant lapis lazuli reminiscent of the streams that once traversed these mountains, or the deep blue skies of the desert. He makes us aware of his legacy, a history of experimentation and synthesis that allows him to present himself as a caiman, or mentor, of an important generation of Tijuana-based artists. 
 
This exhibition presents a new body of work alongside four of his earlier works from the Museum’s permanent collection, including Hecho en Mexico, 2005. In his new series, Blancarte set himself to create 30 paintings, each 30 centimeters by 30 centimeters (approximately 12 X 12 inches). Traditionally working on large-scale canvases and murals, these small canvases allow the artist to intently reinterpret his own history. The series soon expanded and set him in an iconographic mapping of his present with more than 50 works, not all of them represented in the exhibition. 
 
Alvaro Blancarte: Marking the Present is organized by the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego and made possible by proceeds from the 2014 Biennial Art Auction. Institutional support of MCASD is provided by the City of San Diego Commission for Arts and Culture and the County of San Diego Community Enhancement Fund. 
 
Do Ho Suh
March 17 through June 26, 2016
 
Renowned Korean-born sculptor and installation artist Do Ho Suh operates within a distinctly twenty-first century global mode, crafting evocative and visually stunning works that reflect ideas of home, identity, and personal space. Suh’s exhibition will transform MCASD’s downtown site into two very different spaces showcasing related works. 
 
The exhibition will feature a brightly lit area containing large-scale installations that replicate the artist’s apartment spaces from a single building in New York City, created in swaths of luminously colored polyester fabric held together by a subtly incorporated stainless steel armature. Three combined installations—Apartment A, 348 West 22nd Street, New York, NY 10011, USA (2011–2012), Corridor and Staircase, 348 West 22nd Street New York, NY 10011, USA (2011–2012), and Unit 2, 348 West 22nd Street, New York, NY 10011, USA (2014)—encourage the public to wander through an ephemeral, dreamlike representation of a piece of the artist’s personal history, rendered in blocks of translucent color that at once conceal and reveal the details articulated within. A long, salmon-colored corridor connects to a bright red stairway suspended from the ceiling. A veil of blue walls contains a kitchen, bathroom, and living spaces with details including window moldings and interior fixtures. And in Unit 2, the artist’s latest and final work in the series, yellow walls describe additional rooms, which the artist has added to his New York apartment and that served alternately as his studio space and living quarters.
 
In contrast to the airy and bright installation, is the dark, intimate chambers punctuated by glowing light boxes containing works from the artist’s Specimen Series (2013). These pieces replicate appliances and fixtures in exacting detail and, like the larger apartment installations, are constructed entirely out of polyester fabric over a stainless steel framework. For instance, in Specimen Series: Corridor, Radiator, 348 West 22nd Street, APT. New York, NY 10011 (2013), exterior elements such as the precise ridges of a control valve are rendered with meticulous realism. At the same time, the ghostly translucency of the crimson-colored fabric comprising the sculpture lends a delicate, otherworldly air to what would otherwise be a heavy cast iron fixture.
 
Do Ho Suh is organized by The Contemporary Austin with additional support by Lehmann Maupin Gallery, New York and Hong Kong. Funding for the San Diego presentation is made possible by contributions to the annual museum fund. Institutional support of MCASD is provided by the City of San Diego Commission for Arts and Culture and the County of San Diego Community Enhancement Fund.
 
 
Special exhibition
 
ArtOASIS
Through September 6, 2015
 
This year MCASD worked in partnership with Combat Arts, a local nonprofit organization that provides art experiences for combat troops, to create ArtOASIS—a comprehensive arts-based program to support the recovery of active military personnel overcoming Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Through the ArtOASIS program, the Museum offered a series of private gallery tours and weekly art-making workshops that culminated in a publically presented and celebrated showcase of the participants’ artworks.
 
This pilot program was initiated thanks to a generous award from the California Arts Council, one of 24 state-wide grants aiming to demonstrate the power of the arts to transform our communities.
 
The ArtOASIS program at MCASD is proudly supported by the California Arts Council 2014 Creative Communities Program, Mary Keough Lyman, The Seeley Foundation, Cox Cares, proceeds from the 2014 Biennial Art Auction, and annual contributors to the MCASD Fund. Institutional support of MCASD is provided by the City of San Diego Commission for Arts and Culture and the County of San Diego Community Enhancement Fund.
 
This activity is funded by the California Arts Council, a state agency, advancing California through the arts and creativity. Learn more at www.arts.ca.gov. For questions about the ArtOASIS program, please contact Cris Scorza at 858 454 3541 x142 or cscorza@mcasd.org.
 
 
MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY ART SAN DIEGO 
 
Founded in 1941, the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego (MCASD) is the preeminent contemporary visual arts institution in San Diego County. The Museum's collection includes more than 4,500 works of art created since 1950. In addition to presenting exhibitions by international contemporary artists, the Museum serves thousands of children and adults annually at its varied education programs, and offers a rich program of film, performance, and lectures. MCASD is a private, nonprofit organization, with 501c3 tax-exempt status; it is supported by generous contributions and grants from MCASD Members and other individuals, corporations, foundations, and government agencies. Hugh M. Davies is The David C. Copley Director and CEO at MCASD. 
 
Institutional support for MCASD is provided by the City of San Diego Commission for Arts and Culture.