MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY ART SAN DIEGO (MCASD) ANNOUNCES ADVANCE EXHIBITION SCHEDULE THROUGH 2015

 
 
Thursday, Aug 07, 2014 - 11:37 am

 

MCASD’s advance exhibition schedule reflects a strong emphasis on singular artistic voices and one-person shows, with significant space devoted to feats of scale, time, and material. Exhibitions such as Jack Whitten: Five Decades of Painting will give space to a seasoned artist, showcasing the breadth of his mastery spanning more than 50 years of his career. Works by artists Rita McBride, Colter Jacobsen, and El Anatsui will fill MCASD Downtown’s galleries with striking installations.

The Museum will continue to develop group shows, such as Laugh-in, which will bring together 17 artists and artist collectives who engage the strategies and themes of stand-up comedy as a means to rethink questions of artistic performativity, audience participation, and public speech. This exhibition will debut in January 2015 at the Museum’s La Jolla location.

This schedule is current as of August 6, 2014. Please discard previous schedules and call to confirm all information at 858 454 3541 x116, or via e-mail at pdwyer@mcasd.org.

On view at MCASD La Jolla

Tim Youd: The Long Goodbye
Through August 31, 2014

Tim Youd has undertaken to retype one hundred classic novels over the course of five years. Employing the same make and model typewriter used by the author, Youd retypes each book in its entirety on a single page. He stages his durational performances at locations integral to the plot of the novel or pertinent to the author’s life—places they lived or held jobs. Through his pilgrimages to these charged sites, where he sits typing on an antiquated machine, Youd courts the mythologies that attend famed literary figures. At the same time, his performances stand as mechanical demonstrations of endurance—word after word, hour after hour.

In recent months, the artist has retyped each of Raymond Chandler’s Philip Marlowe crime novels, leading up to The Long Goodbye, the sixth in the seven-volume series. The acclaimed detective fiction writer moved to La Jolla in 1946 with his wife Cissy, settling down the street from MCASD’s La Jolla location, on Camino de la Costa. There Chandler wrote The Long Goodbye as well as Playback, which is set in a fictionalized La Jolla that he called “Esmerelda.” This exhibition features new works by Youd related to these novels, as well as selected pieces from the first year of his larger 100 Novels series. During July, Youd will retype Chandler’s The Long Goodbye at MCASD, in the adjacent Krichman Gallery overlooking the ocean. 

Youd’s project is multifaceted, comprising distinct stages of artistic production. First is the performance, in which he types relentlessly on a single sheet of paper backed with an additional sheet. As he runs the doubled page through the carriage again and again, a dark monochrome emerges—that most modern of visual formats—and the novel is rendered illegible. Upon completion, the two sheets are mounted as a diptych, a positive and negative image suggesting two pages of an open book. In a final stage, Youd memorializes the typewriter on which each novel was written, creating a sculptural “portrait” of the machine. Made of layered cardboard that is carved away and painted, this handcrafted sculpture self-consciously fetishizes the tool of the writer, while also standing as a surrogate for the writer him or herself. Youd has made a typewriter portrait for each of the seven Philip Marlow novels, as well as an eighth for the unfinished novel Chandler was working on at the time of his death in 1959. Perhaps these commemorative sculptures, along with Youd’s performances, offer a kind of long goodbye to Chandler himself.

Tim Youd: The Long Goodbye is organized by the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego, and is made possible by proceeds from the 2014 Biennial Art Auction. Institutional support for MCASD is provided, in part, by the City of San Diego Commission for Arts and Culture.

 

Treasures of the Tamayo, Mexico City
Through August 31, 2014

Treasures of the Tamayo Museum, Mexico City brings to San Diego highlights from one of Mexico’s foremost museums of modern and contemporary art. In 1981, Rufino Tamayo (1899–1991) opened the doors of his eponymous museum, to which the Mexican artist donated both his own paintings and his collection of late-modernist and contemporary art. Tamayo built his collection of works by both Mexican artists and those in Europe and the United States with the goal of founding a museum that would promote the artists of his native country and bring Mexico City into a dialogue with the international art community.

Treasures of the Tamayo marks a partnership between two like-minded institutions, which brings to view works never before seen in San Diego. The exhibition presents paintings by Rufino Tamayo himself, objects from the Mexican artist’s collection, and works by contemporary artists the Tamayo Museum has acquired since his death. The selection on view represents the distinct diversity of the Tamayo Museum’s collection, with artists working in Europe, the United States, and Latin America—from Pablo Picasso to Francis Bacon, Mark Rothko to Larry Rivers, and Roberto Matta to Francisco Toledo, among others. The collection’s strength in contemporary art is represented with works by artists such as Gabriel Orozco, Francis Alÿs, and Liliana Porter.

Treasures of the Tamayo Museum, Mexico City is organized by the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego, with generous lead underwriting support provided by Carolyn Farris. Additional funding has been received from David Guss and Susanne Lodl, Faye Hunter, the Consulate General of Mexico, Mexico Tourism Board, and proceeds from the 2014 Art Auction. Institutional support for MCASD is provided, in part, by Mandell Weiss Charitable Trust and the City of San Diego Commission for Arts and Culture.

 

Jack Whitten: Five Decades of Painting
September 20, 2014 through January 4, 2015

For five decades, Jack Whitten (b. 1939, Bessemer, AL) has kept time through his innovative studio process. In his canvases, he explores the possibilities of paint, the role of the artist, and the allure of material essence. As a child of the segregated south, he bears witness to expressions of evil and the resilience of the human spirit. As a diligent formalist, Whitten explores and exploits the newest acrylic and dry pigment media, the register of the image, and the edge of the canvas. As the New York artist, schooled in the sixties and maturing in the seventies, he balances on the fulcrum of the century that was and the century to come. He is an artist of his moment due precisely to his respect for the past and commitment to the present. Whitten creates in the moment in order to harness the essence of matter. From his first spectral canvases, as a graphic trace of a haunted soul, to his recent app for Obama, a key for complex, contemporary life, Whitten’s poetic and physically compelling compositions capture what is needed, what is left, what is remembered, and what is next. Jack Whitten: Five Decades of Painting surveys this enduring artist’s career with approximately 60 canvasses from the mid-1960s to the present.

Jack Whitten: Five Decades of Painting is organized by the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego and made possible by generous lead underwriting support from Dr. Paul Jacobs, and presenting corporate sponsorship from RBC Wealth Management. Additional funding has been provided by The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, the National Endowment for the Arts, LLWW Foundation, and proceeds from the 2014 Biennial Art Auction. Institutional support of MCASD is provided by the City of San Diego Commission for Arts and Culture and the County of San Diego Community Enhancement Fund.

 

Laugh-in: Art, Comedy, Performance
January 22, 2015 through April 19, 2015

Laugh-in: Art, Comedy, Performance explores the particular recent turn toward comedic performance in and as contemporary art. The exhibition features the work of over twenty artists and artist collectives who engage the strategies and themes of stand-up comedy as a means to rethink questions of artistic performativity, audience participation, and public speech. If stand-up evokes the image of an isolated figure, spot-lit on a stage, this form of comedy resonates with contemporary artists precisely for its direct if uncertain relation to an audience or public. Artists today look to stand-up comedy as well for its emphatic embodiment and its ability to upend hierarchies and power relations. Indeed, stand-up offers a forum in which comics and artists alike may examine stereotypes and taboos, testing what can and can’t be said. The exhibition suggests that this format makes particular sense to artists at a moment when they—like citizens everywhere—are seeking new modes of public address.

The title of Laugh-in intentionally conjures the cultural moment of the late 1960s and early 70s and, as in its original iteration as the title of a comedy television program, resonates with the ‘sit-ins’ and ‘be-ins’ of that time—and with political currents in the present. Figures such as Lenny Bruce, Andy Kaufman, Richard Pryor, and a generation of female comedians including Carol Burnett, Goldie Hawn, and Gilda Radner, among many others, are touchstones for the artists in Laugh-in, and the exhibition considers such comics within the context of a larger interest on the part of contemporary artists in the decades of the 1960s and 70s. That period not only saw the rise of stand-up comedy to mainstream prominence, but also crises of political legitimation that find echoes in our own time.

Laugh-in is organized by the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego, with funding provided by the 2014 Art Auction. Institutional support of MCASD is provided by the City of San Diego Commission for Arts and Culture and the County of San Diego Community Enhancement Fund.

 

Gifts from Robert and Dorothy Shapiro
January 24, 2015 through April 19, 2014

Robert and Dorothy Shapiro were avid and joyful contemporary art enthusiasts who were involved with the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego for nearly 50 years, from the 1960s to 2012, as supporters, advocates, and collectors. Together they built a collection of work by both established and emerging contemporary artists, from which they donated twenty objects—in painting, drawing, sculpture, and photography—to the Museum.  This exhibition presents a selection of those works, from David Reed’s expressive abstractions, to Gillian Wearing’s investigations of identity, to Robert Rauschenberg’s playful use of materials, to Luis Gispert’s photographic mash-ups of art history and hip hop culture, and more.

Gifts from Robert and Dorothy Shapiro is organized by the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego and made possible by generous lead underwriting support from the Shapiro family, and proceeds from the 2014 Biennial Art Auction. Institutional support of MCASD is provided by the City of San Diego Commission for Arts and Culture and the County of San Diego Community Enhancement Fund.

 

Dear Nemesis, Nicole Eisenman 1993–2013
May 9, 2015 through September 6, 2015

The definitive mid-career survey of the work of American artist Nicole Eisenman, Dear Nemesis, Nicole Eisenman 1993–2013 charts the development of the artist’s practice across painting, printmaking, and drawing. Over the past twenty years, Eisenman has developed a creative and versatile vision that combines high and low culture with virtuosic skill. Fusing centuries-old art-making conventions and a multitude of art historic influences—including impressionism, German expressionism, and twentieth-century social realist painting—with contemporary subject matter, she depicts settings and themes as varied as bar scenes, motherhood, and the plight of the artist. Among her core concerns are depictions of community, identity, and sexuality.

Eisenman’s continual representation of women (both “butch” and “femme”) and female love not only imbues the practice of figurative painting with an audaciously queer bent but also recasts art history in a feminist light. Her wit spares no one and nothing, and it is indeed through her humor and the discomfort caused by her work that she communicates the multifaceted richness of the human condition. Her incisive sociopolitical critique operates through the quotidian and the absurd, in ways that are both formally playful and visually breathtaking.

Dear Nemesis, Nicole Eisenman 1993–2013 has been organized by the Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis and curator Kelly Shindler. Major support for the exhibition and catalogue has been provided by the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts; Koenig & Clinton, New York; Karin and Peter Haas; Susanne Vielmetter Los Angeles Projects; Ringier AG, Zürich; Galerie Barbara Weiss, Berlin; Cathy and Jonathan Miller; and Richard Gerrig and Timothy Peterson.

 

Tim Mantoani: Behind Photographs
May 9, 2015 through September 6, 2015

San Diego-based Tim Mantoani has spent the last six years making portraits of the photographers responsible for some of the most iconic images in our popular cultural consciousness. While these images are instantaneously recognizable, their makers often remain unknown in mainstream culture, their names appearing in fine print and their likenesses rarely shown.  Using a 20 x 24 Polaroid camera, Mantoani shoots these photographers holding their favorite or most famous images. William Wegman appears with a life-size photograph of his Weimaraner dog Bobbin. Nick Ut presents his Pulitzer Prize-winning image of a young girl during a napalm attack in Vietnam. Michael Halsband poses with his double portrait of Andy Warhol and Jean-Michel Basquiat, both sporting boxing gloves. In 150 portraits, Mantoani addresses the relationship between image and image-maker, while simultaneously paying homage to the visual chroniclers of our age.

Tim Mantoani: Behind Photographs is organized by the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego and made possible by proceeds from the 2014 Biennial Art Auction. Institutional support of MCASD is provided by the City of San Diego Commission for Arts and Culture and the County of San Diego Community Enhancement Fund.

 

Prospect 2015
May 9, 2015 through September 6, 2015

Prospect has become an anticipated annual group exhibition, which highlights the Museum’s curatorial interests, often introducing new artists to the San Diego community. The exhibition showcases select loans alongside objects from the Museum’s own holdings. The borrowed pieces are under consideration for acquisition by the Museum.  While not intended to be viewed thematically, the eclectic grouping nonetheless reveals various curatorial impulses. While MCASD would be delighted to acquire all the works, the final decision is made by the Contemporary and International Collectors, the Museum’s premiere membership groups. The annual dues from these supporters provide funding for the purchase of proposed artworks. At their celebratory selection event, the members will vote for their favored works. It is their ballots which will ultimately determine which of the provocative art works become part of MCASD’s collection.

Prospect 2015 is organized by the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego, with funding provided by MCASD’s International and Contemporary Collectors and the 2014 Biennial Art Auction. Institutional support for MCASD is provided by the City of San Diego Commission for Arts and Culture and the County of San Diego Community Enhancement Fund.

 

Ed Ruscha Then & Now: Paintings from the 1960s and 2000s
January 29, 2016 through April 3, 2016

This exhibition takes as its starting point Ruscha’s early Pop painting Ace (1962) from MCASD’s collection, exploring the word “ace” as a recurring motif in his practice over the years. The iconic artist first gained attention in the 1960s for work that combines text and image with deadpan takes on American vernacular culture. An innovator of West-Coast Pop and Conceptual Art, Ruscha’s work defies and exceeds both categories, drawing upon popular media, commercial culture, and the landscape of Los Angeles. The exhibition builds upon MCASD’s long-standing relationship with Ruscha: the Museum’s collection holds thirty works by the artist including the outdoor mural Brave Men of La Jolla (1995-1996).

This exhibition is organized by guest curator Richard Marshall, an independent curator and art historian based in New York and San Diego. Marshall is Curator of The Lever House Art Collection, New York, and was formerly Curator at the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, where he worked extensively with Ed Ruscha during his twenty-year tenure. He is the author of Ed Ruscha (Phaidon Press) and Edward Ruscha: Los Angeles Apartments (Whitney Museum of American), and has authored exhibitions and books and on artists Jean-Michel Basquiat, Louise Bourgeois, Robert Mapplethorpe, and Joan Mitchell, among others.

Ed Ruscha Then & Now: Paintings from the 1960s and 2000s is organized by the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego and made possible by generous lead underwriting support from Pauline Foster, and proceeds from the 2014 Biennial Art Auction. Institutional support of MCASD is provided by the City of San Diego Commission for Arts and Culture and the County of San Diego Community Enhancement Fund.

 

On view at MCASD Downtown

James Drake: Anatomy of Drawing and Space (Brain Trash)
July 10, 2014 through September 21, 2014

James Drake: Anatomy of Drawing and Space (Brain Trash) is the culmination of two years of active creation, reflecting imagery from throughout the artist’s forty-year career. In 2012, the artist committed himself to drawing every day. Some drawings are immediate, others take days. The resulting 1,246 drawings cull from his personal reservoir of images—wild animals, scientific formulas, personal portraits, art historical figures—and are rendered in pencil, ink and charcoal, often with collage and stencil work. Drake confronts structures that bind and urges that divide: from communication and culture to violence and addiction. Those subjects spill across this massive composition as well as an examination of the human figure from anatomy books to self-portraiture. Drake’s confidence as an artist and virtuosity as a draftsperson are on display in this retrospective reckoning of his overriding themes of order and chaos, life and death, and legacy and innovation. Contemporary and traditional both, this cycle of drawings serve as an echo of the artist’s studio—the artist’s mind—played out on epic scale.

James Drake: Anatomy of Drawing and Space (Brain Trash) is organized by the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego, and is made possible by generous lead underwriting support from Tami and Michael Lang, and corporate underwriting from The San Diego County BMW Centers. Additional funding has been received from Stephen Feinberg and proceeds from the 2014 Biennial Art Auction. Institutional support of MCASD is provided by the City of San Diego Commission for Arts and Culture and the County of San Diego Community Enhancement Fund.

 

Rita McBride: Public Tilt
October 9, 2014 through February 8, 2015

Rita McBride: Public Tilt features three installations by the artist whose work engages the tropes of architectural design, modernist sculpture, and public space. Installed in the expansive volumes of MCASD’s downtown location, Public Tilt, will include the west coast debut of McBride’s celebrated modular construction, Arena. When assembled, Arena forms a massive tiered stadium-like structure, which will be programmed with activities throughout the course of the exhibition. The sculpture’s space, both the bleacher-like seating and the implied stage, is activated by the public, who climbs, gathers, views, and meets. If Arena’s arcing design provides a welcoming embrace, then National Chain offers a halting counterpoint. Here, a grid of metallic units, a “dropped ceiling,” is suspended from the rafters. The seemingly fallen plane creates a kind of architectural tide line, which rests at torso-height creating an obstructive horizon. McBride’s consideration of architecture, art, and forms of display, continues in her revised presentation of the rattan sculpture, Toyota, which will be presented, exposed, on a newly designed angled pedestal. Rita McBride (Des Moines, Iowa, U.S.A.) lives and works between Dusseldorf, Germany, and Los Angeles, California. She studied at Bard College, New York, and received an MFA from the California Institute of the Arts. Since 2003 she has been a professor at The Kunstakademie, Dusseldorf, where she was recently appointed Director.

Rita McBride: Public Tilt is organized by the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego and made possible by generous lead underwriting support from Brenda Potter, as well as proceeds from the 2014 Biennial Art Auction. Institutional Support for MCASD is provided, in part, by the City of San Diego Commission for Arts and Culture.

 

This is How We Walk on the Moon: Colter Jacobsen
October 9, 2014 through February 8, 2015

Colter Jacobsen’s time-based drawings and found object installations stand as mediations on memory and forgetting, seeing and blindness, lust and longing. The San Francisco-based artist, who has roots in the San Diego County town of Ramona, presents new work inspired by his recent travels by foot and train along the coast of California. Jacobsen’s first solo exhibition in a museum, This is How We Walk on the Moon will also include a selective survey of key works made over the past several years.

This is How We Walk on the Moon: Colter Jacobsen is organized by the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego and made possible by proceeds from the 2014 Biennial Art Auction. Institutional Support for MCASD is provided, in part, by the City of San Diego Commission for Arts and Culture and the County of San Diego Community Enhancement Fund.

 

Gravity and Grace: Monumental Works by El Anatsui
March 5, 2015 to June 28, 2015

The celebrated work of El Anatsui strikes a rare combination of stunning beauty, labor-intensive process, and deep metaphorical and poetic meaning. A global artist, Anatsui draws on artistic and aesthetic traditions from his birth country of Ghana; his home in Nsukka, Nigeria; and various Western art forms. Anatsui’s work is about transformation. Using found materials such as printing plates, milk tin lids, and aluminum liquor bottle caps allows the artist full freedom to improvise and invent. Anatsui is also captivated by the history of use that such materials retain. For his metal wall hangings, Anatsui recycles bottle caps from a distillery in his home town, piecing them together to form monumental curtains patterned with rows upon rows of different brands of liquor bottle caps. For the artist, given liquor’s key history in the slave trade, these works reference relationships between Europe, Africa, and the United States. Not only does Anatsui’s alchemical transformation of discarded materials raise pressing issues of global consumerism, but it highlights the blurring of geographic identities.

Gravity and Grace features monumental wall and floor sculptures widely considered to represent the apex of the artist’s career. In addition, a series of drawings illuminates the artist’s process, while wooden wall reliefs reference his earlier work in wood and bear fascinating compositional relationships to the large metal pieces.

Gravity and Grace: Monumental Works by El Anatsui is organized by the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego and made possible by generous lead underwriting gifts from and Dr. Paul Jacobs and Sheryl and Harvey White. Additional funding has been provided with proceeds from the 2014 Art Auction. Institutional support of MCASD is provided by the City of San Diego Commission for Arts and Culture and the County of San Diego Community Enhancement Fund

 

Jock Reynolds and Suzanne Hellmuth 
July 16, 2015 through November 1, 2015

In an exhibition timed to coincide with the centennial of San Diego’s Panama Exposition of 1915, Jock Reynolds and Suzanne Hellmuth take as their point of departure MCASD’s downtown Jacobs Building—once the baggage terminal of the historic Santa Fe Depot—creating a layered, mixed media installation that explores the history of sugar baron and railroad magnate “Sugar Daddy” Spreckels and his “Impossible Railroad.”

Reynolds and Hellmuth began collaborating in the 1970s in San Francisco, where they first worked together on a series of performances.  Their installations, photographs, performances, and public artworks have since been commissioned and presented in solo and group exhibitions in Austria, France, Japan, the Netherlands, and across the United States.  Hellmuth’s and Reynolds’s work is represented in both private and public collections, including the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American Art, the Corcoran Gallery of Art, the Walker Art Center, the Minneapolis Institute of Arts, and the University of Washington’s Henry Art Gallery.

Jock Reynolds and Suzanne Helmuth is organized by the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego and made possible by proceeds from the 2014 Biennial Art Auction. Institutional support of MCASD is provided by the City of San Diego Commission for Arts and Culture and the County of San Diego Community Enhancement Fund.

 

Byron Kim
July 16, 2015 through November 1, 2015

Painter Byron Kim—known for his monochromatic abstractions—pursues a new project for exhibition at MCASD on the occasion of the centennial of San Diego’s Panama–California Exposition, which commemorated the opening of the Panama Canal and prompted the establishment of several cultural institutions still active in the city today. Kim’s interest lies in the Exposition’s ethnography exhibits, which staged displays of living Native Americans performing activities from making traditional crafts, to cooking, to ceremonial dancing. Maria Martinez (1887-1980), an established ceramicist from the San Ildefonso Pueblo in New Mexico's Rio Grande Valley, was featured demonstrating her famed revival of a traditional Pueblo style of black-on-black pottery. Kim takes Martinez’s signature aesthetic as his point of departure for a series of intimately-scaled minimalist works. With these paintings, Kim confronts notions of craft, primitivism, modernism, and the complicated legacy of events such as the Panama-California Exposition.

Byron Kim is organized by the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego and made possible by proceeds from the 2014 Biennial Art Auction. Institutional support of MCASD is provided by the City of San Diego Commission for Arts and Culture and the County of San Diego Community Enhancement Fund.

 

Anya Gallacio
July 16, 2015 through November 1, 2015

Anya Gallaccio is known for installations that employ organic materials that are subject to change and decay—flowers and fruit, sugar and ice—even as her work is inflected with a minimalist vocabulary suggesting durability and timelessness.  In a new site-specific project for MCASD’s Farrell Gallery in the Jacobs Building, Gallaccio takes inspiration from the Southern California landscape, exploring the spatial and geological properties of its rugged terrain.  First exhibited at MCASD in 1994 as part of inSITE, Gallaccio’s work has been presented in numerous international solo exhibitions. A Turner Prize nominee in 2003, the British-born artist is based in San Diego and teaches at the University of California San Diego.

Anya Gallaccio is organized by the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego and made possible by proceeds from the 2014 Biennial Art Auction. Institutional support of MCASD is provided by the City of San Diego Commission for Arts and Culture and the County of San Diego Community Enhancement Fund.

For interviews and high-resolution images, please contact Communications & Marketing Manager Leah Straub or Communications Associate Patricia B. Dwyer.

 

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MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY ART SAN DIEGO

Founded in 1941, the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego (MCASD) is the preeminent contemporary visual arts institution in San Diego County. The Museum's collection includes more than 4,000 works of art created since 1950. In addition to presenting exhibitions by international contemporary artists, the Museum serves thousands of children and adults annually at its varied education programs, and offers a rich program of film, performance, and lectures. MCASD is a private, nonprofit organization, with 501c3 tax-exempt status; it is supported by generous contributions and grants from MCASD Members and other individuals, corporations, foundations, and government agencies. Hugh M. Davies is The David C. Copley Director and CEO at MCASD.

Institutional support for MCASD is provided by the City of San Diego Commission for Arts and Culture.

www.mcasd.org